Oh My Geode – Rocks with a Surprise

0 comments

From finding cash in your pocket to random compliments from strangers – we love a good unexpected surprise to lift our vibrations for the day.

It is probably no surprise then that we LOVE geodes at Crystal & Stone because these rocks are the adult crystal-lover equivalent to getting a Kinder Surprise egg as a kid.

To the unaware, geodes may look like any other rock from the outside. But the real awe and beauty comes from cracking the rock open and finding the crystal formation within.

But what are geodes, where can they be found, and how can you get your hands on one of these beauties.

What is a Geode?

In short, a geode is typically a spherical (round shaped) rock with a hollow cavity in its core centre, which is lined with a cluster of crystals! 

Fun fact: The term geode actually comes from the Greek word Geoides which means "earth-like."

There are a couple of processes through which geodes can be formed:

  • Sedimentary Geodes: formed in materials such as sandstone and limestone where there are gas-filled voids, voids from tree roots etc.
  • Volcanic Geodes: cavities are formed by a bubble in volcanic rock.

But it isn’t as simple as there just being a ‘void’ or cavity present. The ‘crystal’ structure of a geode forms over thousands and thousands of years when silica-rich water makes its way into the rock and over time, crystalises within the cavity.

Over many more years, various crystal layers are formed within the void of the rock to create the unique geode structure.

Where Do You Find Geode Stones?

As we mentioned above, geodes form through a couple of different specific processes, so don’t think you can just pick up any rock in your garden and crack it open to find a geode!

Geodes can be found across the world, but concentrated pockets of geode sites include Spain, Brazil, Uruguay, Namibia, Mexico, and the desert in the United States. 

Closer to home, geodes have been found in New South Wales. 

How Do You Identify Unopened Geodes?

There are a couple of ways to identify a geode before you start trying to split random rocks in half.

  1. Geodes only form in certain regions, so consult a ‘geode map’ to see which areas are most likely to contain these beautiful specimens. When we can travel again, check out places in the US like Nevada, Arizona, Utah and even California.
  2. Look for rocks with a more spherical shape and a lumpy surface, not pointy or narrow in appearance.
  3. Test the weight of the rock compared to other surrounding rocks of a similar size and appearance. If it is lighter in weight, it may have a hollow centre. Give it a tap and see if it sounds hollow too.
  4. Break it open! You’ll never know unless you try. Just make sure you’re using safety googles and the right equipment to split that rock in two. 

Or if you’re a little lazy like us, you can always pop into our Crystal & Stone warehouse to buy crystals in Australia, rather than travelling across the world chasing rocks.

What is the Rarest Geode Colour?

There are five main crystal types you can find within geodes:

  1. Agate
  2. Amethyst
  3. Calcite
  4. Citrinie
  5. Quartz

Out of these, the most rare and valuable geode types are amethyst and black calcite crystals.

Crystal & Stone’s Favourite Geode

What weighs 200kg, is purple, and has the wings of a butterfly? Crystal & Stone’s incredible amethyst geode wings – check them out in this write up from Urban List!

At Crystal & Stone we have a ginormous collection of geodes and crystals for you to buy crystals online or instore at our warehouse in Wangara. 

And the benefit of visiting us in person means you get to not only meet our team and vibe with us in person, but also take a photo with out wings. Bonus points for you singing the cheesiest song that mentions wings while you selfie! 

Shop our range of geodes and crystals at Crystal & Stone today – check out our range on our online store or pop into our warehouse in Wangara.

Leave a comment

All blog comments are checked prior to publishing
You have successfully subscribed!
This email has been registered